NotApathetic is closed to new submissions. The site is available as an archive for you to browse. Find out more...

Not Apathetic

Tell the world why you're not voting - don't let your silence go unheard

They're not voting because...

I'm sure I'm going to make a mistake.

I'm sure I'm making a mistake. It's my first time voting and I want to vote Lib-Dems because of their policy on student fees, and I'm sure it's stupid to vote for a party on the basis of one thing, but I find that the other parties don't appeal to me. Is it wrong to vote for a party on the basis of one thing that appeals to you?

written 25th Apr 2005

Responses

Gavin replies: Hey, why not - most people probably do. But it's worth checking out some of their other (daft) policies, first.

written 25th Apr 2005

Miss Dipsy replies: I'd agree that most people voting don't really know about most of the policies the party they are voting for have put forward, a lot are probably voting on the basis of one or two issues that they feel strongly about. I don't think it makes you stupid to vote on the basis of one thing, but it's definately better to at least have a vague idea of their other policies!
If you want to be sensible about it, just try to find out a little bit more & get the general gist of the party's stance, see how they measure up on other issues you think are important. Also, think about where you'll be in a few years time, and what will matter to you then. Presumably you're a student now, but what about when you leave uni, and have to pay taxes, maybe buy a house or even start a family? Some issues you're not really bothered about now will become important in a very short time, so they're worth thinking about! Even if you still don't have a strong opinion on their other policies, at least you'll know that you're not voting for things you strongly disagree with (although whoever you vote for there will probably be something in their manifesto you disagree with!).
The internet is a great place to get info on the parties, try the bbc site for starters - they've got everything from very general profiles of the political parties to detailed coverage of specific issues that have come up in the campaign.

written 26th Apr 2005

The Doctor replies: Funnily enough, the criteria I'll use for selecting the party I eventually vote for will be the number of things I disagree with all the others about.

Basically I take all the things I hate about each party and vote for the one with the fewest in number, which is a shame, as it's not supposed to be how it works. But until one party stops pandering to minority interest groups, stops rewarding sloth, ignorance and pettiness while trampling freedom of speech and innovation, and stops treating the average guy like an idiot, that's the way I'll do it.

Politicians? Pah! They have a wonderful ability of making us think we're helpless without them. Guy Fawkes had the right idea.

written 26th Apr 2005

Original Poster replies: Well, I've looked into other parties, and nothing really appeals to me about what they say, and I agree with things that Lib-Dems say, except their plan to lower the voting age to 16. Which is wrong, a waste of time. It'll bring a new meaning to apathetic.

written 26th Apr 2005

The Doctor replies: Personally the Lib Dems are my last choice for many reasons, but mostly because of their plans for the Council Tax. Under a Lib Dem government, with no kids and me and the missus working full time, our Council Tax (or whatever clever buzz word they'd use for it once they've "abolished" it) would double. We get very little for our money as it is, but under the Lib Dems, we'd be even worse off.

written 26th Apr 2005

Original Poster replies: Well, to think about it, if I can't find a party to vote for, then I won't vote. Is this a good enough reason?

written 26th Apr 2005

The Doctor replies: In that situation, do what I've found myself doing in the last two general elections. Simply write:

"NONE OF THE ABOVE.......X"

...on your ballot paper.

You've exercised your democratic right to vote and expressed that none of them are worthy of yours. At least you can moan about how crap the government is once they get in, no matter which party they belong to!

written 26th Apr 2005

The Doctor replies: Oh by the way, if you were interested in seeing just how much less (ha ha) you'd be paying under a Lib Dem government, simply take a look at:

www.axethetax.org.uk

I suggest working people with no dependents sit down with a stiff drink first.

written 26th Apr 2005

Original Poster replies: Ooooh, I dunno...wouldn't my post be wasted if I put "none of the above"?

written 26th Apr 2005

The Doctor replies: That depends on how much of a waste you think voting for someone whose policies you mostly disagree with is.

You have to ask yourself the question:

Do I vote for someone who ignores me, marginalises me and treats me with derision all the while telling me I'm oh so important, until the election is over, when he forgets I exist for another five years, or do I say "no" to the lot of them?

I know what MY answer would be.

written 26th Apr 2005

abbie replies: I suppose you've made my mind up. I was having doubts anyway. Well, that's my vote then.

written 26th Apr 2005

Tiger43 replies: To original poster.....Go on, be a devil and make a mistake.

written 26th Apr 2005

Original Poster/abbie replies: Besides, I'm too young to remember what the Tories did, Labour don't seem to be having the best of times, and seeing as Lib Dems haven't had any experience whatsoever, I'm probably going to vote for none of the above anyway. If Lib Dems do win this election, fair do's, I can do what improvement/damage they do.

written 26th Apr 2005

laura replies: I find this debate very interesting. i am 17 and so can not vote except in my school mock election. i would love to be able to vote, i am a politics student taking it for A-level and my family agree that it is ironic that i am the only person in the household who really wants to vote, and yet i am the only person in the household who cannot vote. i am at an age where i can drive, leave home, even marry; and many of the issues being in the vote will really affect me in the next five years, but i have no say in them. i think that is very undemocratic. i believe it is true that many 16yr olds would be apathetic, but why punish me and the many people i know who want to vote, because of a biased view towards the youth of today.

written 26th Apr 2005

Laura replies: Sorry its me again... i would just like to add that i believe you are right on the issue that liberal democrats do not have much experience, they have however been involved in government in Scotland (even though a Scottish person gets more money then an English person does, making it easier to introduce policies such as free education at university, free eye tests and so on... which the english taxes pay for i might add) and last time they were in government, (it was a very long time ago) they introduced the liberal reforms that saved Britain from being a place of disease, starvation, and class divide. The conservatives did every thing they could to privatise the system and basically make the rich richer working on the policy that they must be rich for a reason so lets reward them; and labour well i think we can all see what they have achieved over the past few years. (basically becoming as like the tories as they can get away with - but then again im not a socialist so what does it matter?!). Perhaps we need someone to have a term in government to show new labour and the conservatives that the power lies with the electorate and we wont stand for a two-party system involving two parties who like to argue with each other but agree on most of the issues (or basically an elected dictatorship). That is why i think it would be good to have either New Labour or the Conservatives in power after the next election. i think both parties need to step back and learn about what us the electorate want.

written 26th Apr 2005

AA replies: reply to Laura: The best thing you can do without actually voting is to educate your family and friends who can vote so that they make a wise, valid decision. At least then, your knowledge of current Politics isn't wasted even though you, yourself, can't vote.

written 27th Apr 2005

. replies: actually , the best thing you can do is completely ditch the concept that there is a difference between the lib/lab/con party set up. there is none they are all. ask yourself... why does nothing ever seem to change for the better, regardless of who is in power? this election is a smokescreen, with a lot of hot air expelled on tv shows which are presided over by presenters asking the "correct" questions. forget the trivia that these people are endlessly discussing. look deeper into what is actually happening....the headlong relentless rush into a european power block ...throwing away sovereignty...open borders....regionalisation of england....always ask why and who benefits!

written 27th Apr 2005

Tiger43 replies: To Laura.....Well its just unfortunate that your`e just 1 year too young before this general election. You know, if I remember rightly thats pretty much how it was for me. Your`e a victim of being born at the wrong time for this election. Thats life. But you can`t change the law to suit 17 year olds so they don`t miss a particular election, because then you will get the 16 year olds saying the same as you and so on until voting age will be bought down to 5 year olds and so it goes on. Eventually babies in the womb will get the right to vote.

written 27th Apr 2005

Rob replies: Tiger43: Now that's just silly - on the same argument, we'd let 5 year olds marry and drive, etc. As Laura just argued, she's regarded old enough to drive, leave home and marry, so therefore she should certainly be regarded as old enough to vote. It seems a water-tight case to me - and it's unjust she won't be able to have a say in things like employment, taxation, housing etc., that could affect her as much as any "responsible adult".

written 27th Apr 2005

orginal poster replies: Tiger43, you are quite the cynical bastard, aren't you?

written 27th Apr 2005

Tiger43 replies: To original poster.....Absolutely. However I`m a nice bastard. But in my defence I am pulling your leg just slightly, so as the well known scouser saying goes, calm down, calm down.

written 27th Apr 2005

Original Poster replies: Ah, you don't anger me, I just regard you as slightly amusing.

written 27th Apr 2005

About Not Apathetic

NotApathetic was built so that people who are planning not to vote in the UK General Election on May 5th can tell the world why. We won't try to persuade you that voting is a good or a bad idea - we're just here to record and share your explanations. Whether ideological, practical or other, any reason will do.

A lot of users would like us to mention that if you spoil your ballot paper, it will be counted. So if you want to record a vote for "none of the above", you can.

Search